A Walk in the Woods

Horner Wood is an ancient wood pasture on the National Trust’s Holnicote Estate. Some trees are up to 500 years old. It is the habitat for an abundance of wildlife and could tell many stories.  You’ll see pollarded oak trees on your walk through the woods and hopefully spot some Red Deer. Horner Wood used to provide locals with fuel, winter fodder and wood for their tools. Today it is a perfect place to get away from it all.

All photos by Bert Craznak.

#MotivationalMonday: How a local group raised £3000 for charity

A group of friends took on a major challenge last year:  They  wanted to raise money for Wooden Spoon, a Rugby based charity which raises money for disabled and disadvantaged children.

Based on Exmoor, they decided to walk the South West Coast Path from Combe Martin to Minehead. And so they did: 36 miles in 11 hours it took them! The best bit:  They raised £3000.00 for the charity!

“It’s the most stunning part of the Coast Path, and as we are all Exmoor based, it felt so fantastic to complete our challenge.”
David Dunster

 

Here is some background info on Wooden Spoon:

“Wooden Spoon is the children’s charity of rugby. From sensory rooms, specialist playgrounds and sports activity areas to respite, medical and community care, we fund around 70 projects each year that support disadvantaged and disabled children. Since our founding in 1983, we’ve distributed in excess of £24 million, helping over 1 million young people.”

To find out more, pop over to their website www.woodenspoon.org.uk

#ExmoorWalkies: Our favourite dog walks

We are looking for the best dog walking routes on Exmoor. It’s up to you to decide what makes it the best – a river for your dog to swim in or a pub with a beer and lovely food for you at the end of it, we don’t mind!
Please submit up to 10 photos and a description of your favourite #Exmoorwalkie by email to exmoor4all@gmail.com
Don’t forget to tell us the name of your dog(s)!

All entries will be published on Exmoor4all (FB/website). If all goes to plan, we are  putting a little book together with a collection of #Exmoorwalkies, featuring your favourite walks and your photos.

PS The small print:  By submitting your photos and text you allow us to use these in our publications (print & digital).

Exmoor Rambling – 06 February 2017

On Exmoor it’s not hard to find a peaceful place to sit with your thoughts. In fact, you’re spoilt for choice. However, All Saints’ church in Dulverton is somewhere we visit quite often for a ponder. It holds a special place in our hearts but it’s a long story and one for me to tell later on.

Yesterday was no exception and we popped in to feast our eyes on the stunning display of snowdrops in the graveyard there. Taking a pew, so to speak, on a wooden bench under the shelter of the church, we feasted our eyes on the carpet of snowdrops in front of us. The graveyard is awash with flowers at springtime, with crocus popping their heads up through every given spot of grass. But today it was the delicate snowdrop that stole the show, with just a few purple crocus beginning to make an appearance. We sat for a while, watching the woodsmoke curling out of the chimney tops above Dulverton and listened to a robin singing his heart out as we rested. Absolutely breathtaking and so very, very peaceful.

Read more by Exmoor Rambling on their blog.

Exmoor Rambling – 28 January 2017

Neither of us know which way we’re going to turn, or where we’ll end up, once we’re up on the moor. We go where our feet take us and surprise ourselves sometimes. Tomorrow though, I’ve made an executive decision to sit awhile up above Molland as it’s one of my thinking spots and where we’ll both be blowing in the wind one day.

Whether it be sunny, raining, snowing, windy or a right pea souper of a day – it will always be a favourite place full of memories for us both. We’ve sat in freezing weather down on the slopes waiting for this and that to appear and wandered down into valley amongst the bones and boggy bits. We’ ve hidden in the gorse and watched the deer and we’ve climbed the hilly bits and sat and watched the kestrels, buzzards and the cuckoos. It’s a very special place.

Mmm… looks like we might need our waterproofs tomorrow. 

Read more by Exmoor Rambling on their blog.

Snowdrop Valley 2017

On Saturday, 28 January 2017, Snowdrop Valley opens again to visitors until the end of February.

Snowdrop Valley is a privately owned remote valley in a hidden part of Exmoor close to Wheddon Cross.  The Badgworthy Land Company kindly allow access to the valley while the beautiful carpet of snowdrops is in bloom throughout February each year.

Park and Ride buses running on the middle two weeks: Saturday 4th February to Sunday 19th February inclusive.

The first and last weeks are for walkers only and the valley will be closed to traffic. For coach bookings and disabled access please contact the Co-ordinator Gemma Wesley on 07507 797169 or email snowdropvalley@googlemail.com

Find out more here

5 things to do in Lynton & Lynmouth this Summer

The twin towns of Lynton & Lynmouth are in the middle of the rugged Exmoor coastline with Lynton 500 feet above Lynmouth and the two towns connected by a cliff funicular railway. Five reasons to visit Lynton & Lynmouth this summer include open air Macbeth, the most scenic of Devon cream teas, a new arts trail, scenery that influenced the Romantic Poets and riding a water powered funicular.

See Macbeth in the Valley of the Rocks

New for this summer is the Pleasure Dome Theatre, an open-air theatre set in the dramatic and beautiful scenery of The Valley of The Rocks near Lynton.  The Pleasure Dome Theatre are an artistic collective with the aim of using the natural landscape of the area to make Exmoor a cultural destination as well as a tourist hub. Their first performance is Macbeth which will be running from August 2nd until the 20th.

Enjoy a scenic Cream Tea at Watersmeet

The National Trust’s Watersmeet House is a 19th century fishing lodge with a beautiful Edwardian tea garden. Living up to its name, Watersmeet is where the East Lyn and Hoar Oak Water meet and cream teas can be enjoyed overlooking the rivers and spotting herons and dippers. Watersmeet is also located along some of Exmoor’s best walking and so makes a great spot for a mid-hike rest.

Indulge in Exmoor culture on the Arts Trail

Exmoor Arts Trail is a new concept which makes it easy for people to engage with art, craft and photography on and around Exmoor. Through-out the year visitors to Exmoor can use a web page with a clickable map that shows participating venues on the Trail including art and craft shops and galleries, eateries which have art on the walls, art and craft workshop venues and artists and artisans with studios which are open to the public.

Take a ride on a water powered funicular

No trip to the towns of Lynton and Lynmouth would be complete without a trip on the water powered Cliff Railway, formed through an Act of Parliament in 1888 which gave perpetual right to extract up to 60,000 gallons of water a day. The funicular is an exciting way to travel between these two historic towns. Enjoy stunning views of the North Devon Coastline as you glide up and down the 862-foot length of track from Lynmouth nestling at the foot of the cliffs to Lynton perched 500 feet above.

Channel your internal Romantic poet on the Coleridge Way

Walk up to 51 miles through the stunning Somerset countryside of the Quantock Hills, the Brendon Hills and Exmoor, a landscape that inspired Coleridge to produce some of his best known work. At Lynmouth the path links with the South West Coast Path National Trail. A delightful 30-mile circular walk can be made by walking from Porlock on the Coleridge Way to Lynmouth and returning along the coast path. 

For more information on Lynton and Lynmouth visit http://www.visit-exmoor.co.uk